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There’s a game you can play in your yard during these late summer months. You may  not like it very much, and there aren't any cash or prizes to win, let’s call it ‘What’s That Weed?’

All this rain causes everything to grow at a fast pace, and that includes nasty weeds, like sedges, crabgrass and dollarweed. Take a look outside. What’s that peeking through your lawn and landscape beds? I hope this blog helps you name and get rid of those unwanted guests.

                                                                          

Purple nutsedge

Yellow nutsedge

Sedge struggles

If you see something that looks kind of like grass, that a closer look it may be a sedge. This family of weeds loves the wet ground. They usually have triangular stems, grow straight up, and some have flowers.

The most common are yellow nutsedge and purple nutsedge.

Once they move into your yard, sedges are challenging to get rid of and even control. They spread by tiny seeds or underground through tubers, which are part of the root system. Get this; one yellow nutsedge tuber can produce 1,900 more weeds and 7,000 new tubers in a single growing season.

Crabgrass

Gross grass

Even reading its name can make a homeowner cringe, get ready for it, we’re talking about crabgrass. The flat pencil-thick leaves, the sprawling edges is there anything to like about crabgrass?

We use the best applications we can, and even sometimes this pervasive pest still manages to crawl into unsuspecting yards. There are times to take drastic measures and just cut it out.

Beastly broadleafs

It looks like a lily pad, but you don’t want dollarweed on your property. This big broadleaf spreads fast in wet areas. The best way to get rid of it is to get dirty and pull it out. But there are some home remedies. Grab some sugar or vinegar from your pantry. Spreading either on the weed can kill it.

Dollarweed

Florida pusley as you can guess is native to our neighborhoods, but that doesn’t mean you want to keep it around. This stuff grows low to the ground to form a thick patch of broadleaves and tiny white flowers.

Florida pulsey

The best defense against Florida pusley is a good healthy turf. This aggressive weed only attacks weak lawns with fungus or bug problems.

No one knows the ‘What’s That Weed’ game like us at Esterline Landscape. Stay strong; combat that crabgrass, duel the dollarweed, and smack that sedge. Remember if you need an expert to win this seemingly never-ending war on weeds, contact us. Good luck out there.

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